Monday, August 29, 2005

AT LEAST TWICE IN 50 YEARS TWO PRIME MINISTERS HAVE TAKEN US TO WAR FOR NO LEGITIMATE REASON, KILLING INNOCENT BRITISH SOLDIERS AND FOREIGN CIVILIANS INCLUDING WOMEN AND CHILDREN. THE SUEZ CANAL AND IRAQ, AND THE REASONS FOR WAR SPUN BY BRITISH INTELLIGENCE AND SUPPORTED BY NODDING MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT.
WHY ARE WE REPORTING TENNIS,CRICKET, AND FOOTBALL RESULTS WHEN THE PRIME MINISTER AND HIS GOVERNMENT ARE KILLING SOLDIERS AND CIVILIANS OVERSEAS, AND WATCHING AS PEOPLE DIE IN PAKISTAN AS A RESULT OF THEIR FAILURE TO PROVIDE THE SUPPORT THAT THEY PLEDGED.
WHY DID YOU KILL MY FATHER AND MY FAMILY???

WHAT HAVE I DONE TO YOU???

I DON'T KNOW ANY AMERICANS or BRITISH PEOPLE. NOW, I WILL HATE THEM ALL MY LIFE!!!!! Why do they not invade Israel??? They have weapons of mass destruction, and they use them





WHY??? WHY???
HOW MANY MORE MUST DIE! Vanunu showed us Isreals weapons of mass destruction -they jailed him for 18 years- Israel have a known arsenal of nuclear weapons of mass destruction, and we ignore it, and deny International Human Rights to the man who shows us them, whilst borrowing money from the Bankers.Israel killed 34 Americans on USS Liberty, and holed the ship with a torpedo.
Anthony Eden took us to War with Egypt for the same reasons as Tony Blair, with the same plausible but dishonest reasons. British Intelligence provided the same intelligence reports suggesting weapons of mass destruction.
In fact 50 years later, only the names and political parties have changed, but the Bankers and Financiers have remained.And Blair is as believable as Eden was.

ONLY THE GLOBAL ELITE, BANKERS AND POLITICIANS WIN




HOW MANY POLITICIAN or BANKERS FAMILY HAVE BEEN KILLED IN THESE WARS.
GOVERNMENTS WAGE BANK FINANCED WARS FOR BANKERS INTERESTS.
BANKERS AND POLITICIANS WIN WARS ON THE BODIES OF THEIR INVESTORS AND ELECTORATE.
GOVERNMENTS KILL THEIR ELECTORATE TO PRESERVE THEIR FINANCIERS INTEREST?????

The secret Downing Street memoSECRET AND STRICTLY PERSONAL - UK EYES ONLY

DAVID MANNING
From: Matthew Rycroft
Date: 23 July 2002
S 195 /02

cc: Defence Secretary, Foreign Secretary, Attorney-General, Sir Richard Wilson, John Scarlett, Francis Richards, CDS, C, Jonathan Powell, Sally Morgan, Alastair Campbell

IRAQ: PRIME MINISTER'S MEETING, 23 JULY

Copy addressees and you met the Prime Minister on 23 July to discuss Iraq.

This record is extremely sensitive. No further copies should be made. It should be shown only to those with a genuine need to know its contents.

John Scarlett summarised the intelligence and latest JIC assessment. Saddam's regime was tough and based on extreme fear. The only way to overthrow it was likely to be by massive military action. Saddam was worried and expected an attack, probably by air and land, but he was not convinced that it would be immediate or overwhelming. His regime expected their neighbours to line up with the US. Saddam knew that regular army morale was poor. Real support for Saddam among the public was probably narrowly based.

C reported on his recent talks in Washington. There was a perceptible shift in attitude. Military action was now seen as inevitable. Bush wanted to remove Saddam, through military action, justified by the conjunction of terrorism and WMD. But the intelligence and facts were being fixed around the policy. The NSC had no patience with the UN route, and no enthusiasm for publishing material on the Iraqi regime's record. There was little discussion in Washington of the aftermath after military action.

CDS said that military planners would brief CENTCOM on 1-2 August, Rumsfeld on 3 August and Bush on 4 August.

The two broad US options were:

(a) Generated Start. A slow build-up of 250,000 US troops, a short (72 hour) air campaign, then a move up to Baghdad from the south. Lead time of 90 days (30 days preparation plus 60 days deployment to Kuwait).

(b) Running Start. Use forces already in theatre (3 x 6,000), continuous air campaign, initiated by an Iraqi casus belli. Total lead time of 60 days with the air campaign beginning even earlier. A hazardous option.

The US saw the UK (and Kuwait) as essential, with basing in Diego Garcia and Cyprus critical for either option. Turkey and other Gulf states were also important, but less vital. The three main options for UK involvement were:

(i) Basing in Diego Garcia and Cyprus, plus three SF squadrons.
(ii) As above, with maritime and air assets in addition.
(iii) As above, plus a land contribution of up to 40,000, perhaps with a discrete role in Northern Iraq entering from Turkey, tying down two Iraqi divisions.

The Defence Secretary said that the US had already begun "spikes of activity" to put pressure on the regime. No decisions had been taken, but he thought the most likely timing in US minds for military action to begin was January, with the timeline beginning 30 days before the US Congressional elections.

The Foreign Secretary said he would discuss this with Colin Powell this week. It seemed clear that Bush had made up his mind to take military action, even if the timing was not yet decided. But the case was thin. Saddam was not threatening his neighbours, and his WMD capability was less than that of Libya, North Korea or Iran. We should work up a plan for an ultimatum to Saddam to allow back in the UN weapons inspectors. This would also help with the legal justification for the use of force.

The Attorney-General said that the desire for regime change was not a legal base for military action. There were three possible legal bases: self-defence, humanitarian intervention, or UNSC authorisation. The first and second could not be the base in this case. Relying on UNSCR 1205 of three years ago would be difficult. The situation might of course change.

The Prime Minister said that it would make a big difference politically and legally if Saddam refused to allow in the UN inspectors. Regime change and WMD were linked in the sense that it was the regime that was producing the WMD. There were different strategies for dealing with Libya and Iran. If the political context were right, people would support regime change. The two key issues were whether the military plan worked and whether we had the political strategy to give the military plan the space to work.

On the first, CDS said that we did not know yet if the US battleplan was workable. The military were continuing to ask lots of questions.

For instance, what were the consequences, if Saddam used WMD on day one, or if Baghdad did not collapse and urban warfighting began? You said that Saddam could also use his WMD on Kuwait. Or on Israel, added the Defence Secretary.

The Foreign Secretary thought the US would not go ahead with a military plan unless convinced that it was a winning strategy. On this, US and UK interests converged. But on the political strategy, there could be US/UK differences. Despite US resistance, we should explore discreetly the ultimatum. Saddam would continue to play hard-ball with the UN.

John Scarlett assessed that Saddam would allow the inspectors back in only when he thought the threat of military action was real.

The Defence Secretary said that if the Prime Minister wanted UK military involvement, he would need to decide this early. He cautioned that many in the US did not think it worth going down the ultimatum route. It would be important for the Prime Minister to set out the political context to Bush.

Conclusions:

(a) We should work on the assumption that the UK would take part in any military action. But we needed a fuller picture of US planning before we could take any firm decisions. CDS should tell the US military that we were considering a range of options.

(b) The Prime Minister would revert on the question of whether funds could be spent in preparation for this operation.
(c) CDS would send the Prime Minister full details of the proposed military campaign and possible UK contributions by the end of the week.

(d) The Foreign Secretary would send the Prime Minister the background on the UN inspectors, and discreetly work up the ultimatum to Saddam.

He would also send the Prime Minister advice on the positions of countries in the region especially Turkey, and of the key EU member states.

(e) John Scarlett would send the Prime Minister a full intelligence update.

(f) We must not ignore the legal issues: the Attorney-General would consider legal advice with FCO/MOD legal advisers.

(I have written separately to commission this follow-up work.)

MATTHEW RYCROFT

(Rycroft was a Downing Street foreign policy aide)

The Following is a result of the BUSH and BLAIR Agreement.
BLAIR and BUSH should be tried as WAR CRIMINALS.......

The consequences of their in giving their Democracy to free the Iraqi justify
Killing their own Electorate
Torturing and Killing the Iraqi people
and imprisoning others without any Legal, Moral, Human rights.
And condemning other Countries for doing this..........

Military Fatalities: By Time Period

Period US UK Other* Total Avg Days
4 458 9 16 483 2 222
3 579 26 27 632 3 216
2 718 27 58 803 2 424
1 140 33 0 173 4 43
Total 1895 95 101 2091 3 905



In Memory of the Dead

Obituaries


Alan Brackenbury

Monday, June 13 2005 @ 09:39 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence must confirm the death of Lance Corporal Alan Brackenbury of The King's Royal Hussars, in the early hours of Sunday 29 May 2005, during an incident to the South of Al Amarah, Iraq.
LCpl Brackenbury was serving with A Squadron, part of the 1 STAFFORDS battlegroup in Iraq. Aged 21, LCpl Brackenbury was from East Riding, Yorkshire. He joined the Army in 2000 and was promoted to Lance Corporal in 2005.
Alan is survived by his father Stephen, mother Janet, brother David, and sister Faye. His father said:
"Alan loved being in the army - it was all he had ever wanted to do. He was immensely proud to be a soldier and we were immensely proud that he was a soldier. It is some comfort to us, as we grieve for Alan, that he died doing what he loved so much."
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Anthony John Wakefield

Tuesday, May 24 2005 @ 08:01 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death in Iraq of Guardsman Anthony John Wakefield during the early hours of 2 May 2005.
Guardsman Wakefield, a married father of three from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, died as a result of wounds sustained during a routine patrol in Al Amarah, Iraq. He was 24. His Company of the 1st Battalion The Coldstream Guards is currently serving alongside 1 Staffords (Staffordshire Regt.) in Maysan Province, Iraq.
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Mark Stephen Dobson

Tuesday, May 24 2005 @ 07:57 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Mark Stephen Dobson of B (Green Howards) Company, The Tyne-Tees Regiment, was found dead in his accommodation at Basrah Air Station on 28 March 2005. The incident is being investigated but is not thought to have been the result of hostile action. Private Dobson was 41 years old and came from County Durham.
Private Dobson joined the Territorial Army in July 1996. He deployed to Iraq on 10 November 2004, and was attached to the Force Protection Unit providing security for personnel working out of the Multi National Division (South East) Headquarters at Basrah Air Station.
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David Edward Williams

Friday, February 11 2005 @ 07:57 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Corporal David Edward Williams, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. Aged 37, he was a Survival Equipment Fitter serving with the Engineering Wing at RAF Lyneham, the home-base for all RAF Hercules.
Married with 3 young children, Dave Williams was a devoted husband and proud father. Colleagues remember him as a happy-go-lucky character, with a mischievous personality and a dry sense of humour; forever joking, making light of any conditions in any location. A member of the Royal Air Force for 17 years, he had amassed a wealth of knowledge and was a totally dedicated individual who epitomised professionalism.
The media are asked to respect the family's privacy at this very difficult time.
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Robert Michael OConnor

Friday, February 11 2005 @ 07:55 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Sergeant Robert Michael O'Connor, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. Aged 38 and single, he was an Engineering Technician serving with the Engineering Wing at RAF Lyneham, the home-base for all RAF Hercules.
Bob O’Connor joined the Royal Air Force as an Apprentice in October 1985. On completion of his apprenticeship, he was posted to RAF Lyneham, where he spent the vast majority of his Service career, excepting a short tour at nearby RAF Brize Norton. He was held in the highest esteem and regard by his work colleagues and superiors for his knowledge, dedication and professionalism. During his tours, he was an active sportsman and a keen participant in all aspects of the fabric of station life. He will be sadly missed by his loved ones, colleagues and friends, particularly the small section of engineers who worked closely with him. All our thoughts are with his family and loved ones at the time.
The media are asked to respect the family's privacy at this very difficult time.
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Richard Antony Brown

Friday, February 11 2005 @ 07:52 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Chief Technician Richard Antony Brown, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. An avionics specialist, aged 40 and divorced, he served with the Engineering Wing at RAF Lyneham, the home-base for all RAF Hercules.
Richard Brown joined the Royal Air Force in 1983, and has served two tours of duty at RAF Lyneham, beginning his second tour in 1998. Richie, as everyone called him, was a keen and active sportsman who was always extremely enthusiastic and committed in everything he did. He was totally dedicated and professional in his approach to all his duties, and was always willing and eager to help others. Indeed, he worked ceaselessly for charity and in 1998 was awarded an 11 Group Commendation for his charity work during his time at RAF Kinloss. He was highly thought of and will be sadly missed by all those who served alongside him, particularly the small section of engineers who worked closely with him.
The media are asked to respect the family's privacy at this very difficult time.
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Gary Nicholson

Friday, February 11 2005 @ 07:49 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with great regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Master Engineer Gary Nicholson, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. Aged 42 and divorced, he was an Air Engineer serving with 47 Squadron at RAF Lyneham.
Gary Nicholson 'Gary Nic' was born in Hull on 12 March 1962. He joined the RAF on 13 April 1982 and undertook training as an Air Engineer at RAF Finningley on 15 September 1982. He was awarded his Air Engineer brevet on 15 August 1983 and was posted to RAF Lyneham to join the Hercules fleet.
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Andrew Paul Smith

Friday, February 11 2005 @ 07:47 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Flight Lieutenant Andrew Paul Smith, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. A pilot serving with 47 Squadron, based at RAF Lyneham, he was a single man aged 25.
Andrew ‘Smudge’ Smith was born on 1 July 1979 in Doncaster and educated at Matthew Humberstone School, Cleethorpes. Andrew then read Environmental Management at Lancaster University, where he gained a BSc (Hons). He joined Liverpool University Air Squadron at RAF Woodvale on 6 December 1997, where he commenced his elementary flying training. He was commissioned as an RAF Officer on 6 August 2000 and was posted to RAF Linton-on-Ouse where he continued his flying training. He was awarded his pilot’s wings in 2002 and joined the Hercules fleet on 29 August 2003.
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Squadron Leader Patrick Brian Marshall

Thursday, February 10 2005 @ 08:21 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Squadron Leader Patrick Brian Marshall, Royal Air Force, is missing believed killed following the loss of an RAF C-130K Hercules aircraft over Iraq on 30 January 2005. Aged 39 and divorced, he was a staff officer serving with Headquarters Strike Command, High Wycombe, and was on temporary detachment to Iraq as a liaison officer.

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Steven Jones

Thursday, February 03 2005 @ 08:54 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
BBC -- The family of a servicemen feared killed when an RAF Hercules crashed in central Iraq have paid tribute to a "adventurous, fun loving" young man.
Acting L/Cpl Steven Jones was on the plane when it crashed 25 miles (40km) north-west of Baghdad on Sunday.
The 25-year-old, from Fareham in Hampshire, was one of 10 servicemen thought to have died in the crash.
The men's deaths would represent the largest single loss of British life in Iraq since military action began.
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Blair Salutes RAF Victims

Thursday, February 03 2005 @ 08:44 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
The Scotsman -- Prime Minister Tony Blair tonight led the tributes to 10 servicemen killed in the RAF Hercules crash in Iraq.During Prime Minister’s Questions he said the thoughts and prayers of MPs were with the families of those who were on board.He pledged to “stay the course” in Iraq and help it towards democracy following the “heartwarming” elections at the weekend.They were taking place on Sunday when the crash occurred and Mr Blair said: “It is doubly tragic that it happened on a day of such hope in Iraq.”Mr Blair said MPs would be united in paying tribute to “the brave service personnel” who were on the plane.Tory leader Michael Howard said: “It is an acutely painful reminder of the sacrifices made at our behest and on our behalf. We mourn their loss and pay tribute to their courage.”Mr Blair refused to speculate on the cause of the crash amid claims by militant groups that they shot down the aircraft.His words came as further details emerged about the nine RAF men and one soldier who died.
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Flight Sergeant Mark Gibson

Wednesday, February 02 2005 @ 08:46 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

ICWales -- HE family of the Welsh serviceman killed when a Hercules plunged into the Iraqi desert last night paid tribute to his dedication to the RAF.
Flight Sergeant Mark Gibson couldn't wait to follow his father into the service. As soon as he left school at 18, he realised his boyhood ambition by joining up.
Air-loadmaster Mark, 34, served with 47 Squadron based at RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire and lived in Swindon with his wife Sheila and young daughter Poppy.
He was awarded Operational Service Medals for Sierra Leone, Afghanistan and Iraq.
Mark went to school in Cardiff before the family moved to West Wales where his father Sam was based at RAF Brawdy, near St Davids, Pembrokeshire. Mark has two younger brothers - one Neil is also a loadmaster in the RAF.
Mark's death stunned many of his family who did not even know he was in Iraq.
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Flight Lieutenant David Stead

Wednesday, February 02 2005 @ 08:43 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Scotsman.com - The pilot of an RAF Hercules that crashed in the Iraqi desert was a devoted family man, a close friend said today. Flight Lieutenant David Stead, 35, was one of ten killed in the worst single loss of life to hit UK forces since military action in the country began.The Queen has expressed her sadness at the loss of life and sent a message of sympathy to the families of the victims, who were named yesterday.Fl Lt Stead, who lived in the village of Lyneham, Wiltshire, left a wife and two young children.
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Sergeant Paul Connolly

Monday, January 31 2005 @ 02:53 PM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Sergeant Paul Connolly was found dead from a gunshot wound within the confines of Shaibah Logistic Base on 26 December 2004. His death is being investigated by the Royal Military Police, but initial inquiries do not indicate hostile action or other suspicious circumstances. Sergeant Connolly, inevitably nicknamed "Billy", served with the Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, attached to 21 Engineer Regiment of the Royal Engineers. Aged 33, he came from Crawley in West Sussex, and was separated, with three children.
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Pita Tukutukuwaqa

Thursday, November 11 2004 @ 09:02 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

FIJI Times -- THE body of British Army soldier Private Pita Tukutukuwaqa, is expected to arrive in the country late next week, the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence said.
He died on Monday in a roadside bomb attack at Camp Dogwood, 32km from Baghdad, south of Iraq, an area dubbed the "triangle of death''.
Private Tukutukuwaqa's body was airlifted from Basra Air Station to the UK and currently lies at the Military Hospital in Wiltshire, Scotland.
In a solemn ceremony at Basra Air Station, six of the eight Fijian boys attached to the Black Watch regiment carried Private Tukutukuwaqa's coffin onto a military plane.
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Scott McArdle

Wednesday, November 10 2004 @ 08:26 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Grampiantv.co.uk -- The families of the three Black Watch soldiers killed in yesterday's devastating suicide attack in Iraq have spoken of the heartache and shock felt at their loss.
And regimental comrades have hailed the heroism and bravery of the young men who they say died doing a job they loved.
Flowers for the fallen at the Black Watch base in Warminster.
Two hundred soldiers' families live in the garrison town.
News of the threemen's deaths has left people shocked and saddened.
Here, a small corner of Glenrothes in Fife the peace of this place shattered by the terrible events thousands of miles away.
It was the home of this young man - twenty two year old Private Scott McArdle.
He was on his second tour of duty in Iraq.
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Stuart Robert Tennant Gray

Tuesday, November 09 2004 @ 10:00 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Sergeant Stuart Robert Tennant Gray of the 1st Battalion The Black Watch was killed by a suicide car-bomb attack on a vehicle check-point in Iraq on 4 November 2004.
Aged 31, he was married with two children, and came from Dunfermline, Fife. Sergeant Gray had served twelve years in the Army. He was educated at Pitcorthie Primary School and Woodmill High School.
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Paul Aitken Lowe

Tuesday, November 09 2004 @ 09:56 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Paul Aitken Lowe of the 1st Battalion The Black Watch was killed by a suicide car-bomb attack on a vehicle check-point in Iraq on 4 November 2004. Aged 19, he was single and came from Fife. He had been in the Army three years.
Private Paul Lowe was a keen and admirable young soldier who had wanted to join The Black Watch from the age of seven years. A very able and talented drummer while still at school, at Kelty in Fife, he continued his interest throughout his year-long training at the Army Apprentice College in Yorkshire and subsequent training at Catterick. He was a popular, lively young man at home and in the Battalion, having joined The Black Watch in November 2002, aged 17 years, in Germany. He deployed with his Battalion to Kuwait in 2003 and subsequently fought in the period of active combat operations in Iraq War in the spring.
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David Lawrence

Monday, October 18 2004 @ 08:38 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Gunner David Lawrence was killed in an ambush of British military vehicles on the outskirts of Basrah on 28 September 2004. Serving with 1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, he was aged 25 and came from Wallsall.
David ‘Loz’ Lawrence enlisted in June 2001, joining the Royal Artillery. After training at the Army Training Regiment in Pirbright and the Royal School of Artillery at Larkhill, he joined B Battery, 1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, based in Tidworth, operating the AS-90 armoured self-propelled gun. Almost immediately he went on operations; serving with the Battery in Bosnia in 2002. He also took part in the provision of emergency cover under Operation Fresco during the industrial action by firefighters in 2002-3, and deployed on exercise to the British Army’s training facility in Canada.
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Corporal Marc Taylor

Monday, October 18 2004 @ 08:33 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Corporal Marc Taylor was killed in an ambush of British military vehicles on the outskirts of Basrah on 28 September 2004. Aged 27, he came from Ellesmere Port and served with the Corps of Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers, attached to 1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery. He was married with a daughter.
Marc ‘Spud’ Taylor joined the Army in August 1993; choosing REME. After training, his first posting was to 1st Battalion Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, based in Germany, as a Recovery Mechanic. During this time he served an operational tour in the Former Republic of Yugoslavia. In July 1998 he was posted to 17 Port and Maritime Regiment Workshop, based in Marchwood. In August 2000 he moved to 7th Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and completed a tour in Northern Ireland.
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Fusilier Stephen Jones

Wednesday, September 15 2004 @ 08:10 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
BBCNews -- A soldier from north Wales has been killed in a road traffic accident in Iraq, the Ministry of Defence has confirmed.
Fusilier Stephen Jones, 22, from Denbigh, was serving with the Royal Welch Fusiliers when the accident happened.
He was killed 10 miles south of Al Amarah, an MoD spokesman said.
Mr Jones, who was married, was serving with a company of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Welch Fusiliers.
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Lance Corporal Paul Thomas

Thursday, August 19 2004 @ 08:14 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Lance Corporal Paul David Trevor Thomas was killed in action in Basrah on 17 August. A member of the 2nd Battalion The Light Infantry, he was serving in southern Iraq attached to the 1st Battalion The Cheshire Regiment. Aged 29, he was single and came from Welshpool.
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Marc Ferns

Friday, August 13 2004 @ 08:15 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Marc Ferns was killed in an improvised explosive device attack in Basrah on 12 August 2004. Aged 21, he was single and serving with the 1st Battalion The Black Watch, based at Warminster. He came from Glenrothes in Fife, and had previously served in Iraq with the Black Watch during the initial period of major combat operations in the spring of 2003.
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Lee Martin O'Callaghan

Friday, August 13 2004 @ 08:10 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Lee Martin O'Callaghan was killed during an attack by insurgents in Basrah on 9 August 2004. He was aged 20, and came from London. Unmarried, he was serving with the 1st Battalion The Princess of Wales' Royal Regiment based at Tidworth.
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Private Christopher Gordon Rayment

Friday, August 13 2004 @ 08:06 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Christopher Gordon Rayment died in a tragic accident at Al Amarah on 4 August 2004. Aged 22, single and from London, he was serving with the 1st Battalion The Princess of Wales' Royal Regiment.
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Kristian Michel Alexander Gover

Thursday, August 05 2004 @ 08:23 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

IC Scottland -- A British pilot killed in a helicopter crash in Iraq has been identified by the Ministry of Defence.
Flight Lieutenant Kristian Michel Alexander Gover, 30, died when the Puma helicopter came down at Basra Airport.
The MoD has said the exact circumstances are still unclear but it is believed the incident happened at low altitude or airfield level.
Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon said it appeared "unlikely" that the aircraft was brought down by hostile action.
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Gordon Gentle

Friday, July 02 2004 @ 07:55 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

ICSouthLOndon.co.uk -- The body of a British soldier killed in Iraq earlier this week is being flown home.
Fusilier Gordon Gentle, 19, from Glasgow, was killed in a roadside explosion while on a routine patrol in Basra on Monday.
The teenager joined the 1st Battalion Royal Highland Fusiliers just three months before his deployment to Iraq.
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Richard Thomas David Ivell

Monday, February 16 2004 @ 08:16 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
BBC -- A British soldier has died in a road accident at a military base in Iraq, the Ministry of Defence has said.
Richard Thomas David Ivell, 29, a mechanic with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, died at the Shaibah Logistics Base on Thursday.
The MoD said there was "no hostile action" at the southern Iraqi base.
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Sapper Robert Thomson

Tuesday, February 10 2004 @ 10:45 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Sapper Robert Thomson was killed in a tragic accident in Basrah on 31 January 2004.
Aged 22, Robert Thomson was unmarried and came from West Lothian. He was serving with 35 Engineer Regiment, normally based in Paderborn, Germany.
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Rifleman Vincent Windsor

Tuesday, February 10 2004 @ 10:37 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Rifleman Vincent Calvin Windsor was killed in a road traffic accident on 21 January 2004 in Al Amarah. Aged 23, he came from Oxfordshire and was a member of 2nd Battalion The Royal Green Jackets, serving attached to 1st Battalion The Light Infantry in southern Iraq.
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Sergeant Norman Patterson

Friday, January 09 2004 @ 07:58 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Sergeant Norman Patterson, Cheshire Regiment, in a road traffic accident in Baghdad early on 1 January.
Norman Patterson, aged 28, was single and came from Staffordshire.
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Lance Corporal Andrew Jason Craw

Thursday, January 08 2004 @ 10:33 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Lance Corporal Andrew Jason Craw, 1st Battalion Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, died following a tragic incident on a training range near Basrah on 7 January 2004. Aged 21, he was single and came from Clackmannanshire. The incident is under investigation.
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Major James Stenner

Thursday, January 08 2004 @ 07:54 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

ICNetwork.co.uk -- A WELSH soldier believed to have been a member of the SAS has been killed in a road accident in Iraq.
Major James Stenner, 30, was one of two soldiers who died when their car smashed into a wall in the Iraqi capital Baghdad.
Major Stenner, a Welsh Guards' officer from Monmouthshire, was married. It is believed that his wife Mary is expecting their baby in April.
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Ryan Lloyd Thomas

Friday, November 07 2003 @ 04:05 PM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Private Ryan Lloyd Thomas in a road traffic accident whilst on duty in Basrah on 6 November 2003. Aged 18, Private Thomas served with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Wales. His home town was Resolven, near Neath in Glamorgan.
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Corporal Ian Plank

Tuesday, November 04 2003 @ 10:50 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Corporal Ian Plank, who was killed by hostile fire during a Coalition operation in Iraq late on 31 October 2003. Corporal Plank, who was 31 years old, was a member of the Royal Marines.
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Sergeant John Nightingale

Friday, October 03 2003 @ 04:58 PM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -- It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that a British soldier died on 23 September whilst serving at Shaibah near Basrah. The tragic incident, involving a firearm, was not the result of enemy action and the circumstances are being fully investigated by the Royal Military Police.
Sergeant John Nightingale, aged 32, came from Leeds and was a Territorial Army soldier with 217 Transport Squadron, part of 150 Regiment (Volunteers) of the Royal Logistic Corps. He was serving in Iraq with 27 Regiment RLC, at Shaibah Logistic Base.
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Fusilier Russell Beeston

Friday, August 29 2003 @ 03:41 PM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Fusilier Russell Beeston was fatally wounded during an incident at Ali As Sharqi on 27 August 2003. Fusilier Beeston was aged 26 and was a Territorial Army soldier in 52nd Lowland Regiment (Volunteers), serving attached to the 1st Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers in Iraq. He was married and came from Govan.
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Lieutenant Alexander Tweedie

Monday, August 25 2003 @ 08:21 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Lieutenant Alexander Tweedie in an Edinburgh hospital on 22 April. This was following an accident on 1 April in which Lance Corporal Karl Shearer was killed.
Lieutenant Tweedie, who was 25, had served for two and a half years in D Squadron, The Blues & Royals, Household Cavalry Regiment.
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Captain David Jones

Friday, August 15 2003 @ 02:26 PM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Captain David Martyn Jones of 1st Battalion, The Queen's Lancashire Regiment, was killed on 14 August in a bomb attack on a military ambulance in Basrah.
Aged 29, Captain Jones came from Louth in Lincolnshire and was married. He had been working on civil-military cooperation projects in Basrah to reconstruct the city after the years of neglect and repression under Saddam.
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Private Jason Smith

Thursday, August 14 2003 @ 12:56 PM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the Private Jason Smith in southern Iraq on 13 August. The cause of his death is the subject of an investigation but was not the result of enemy action.
Aged 32, Jason Smith had served with the Territorial Army since 1992 and came from Hawick. A soldier in the 52nd Lowland Regiment, he was serving in Iraq attached to the 1st Battalion, The King's Own Scottish Borderers. He was unmarried but had a long-term partner.
His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Jim Wilson, said:
"Jason Smith was a very well liked and much respected member of 52nd Lowland Regiment and of D Company. He joined the Regiment in October 1992 and, since then, has taken part enthusiastically in all regimental activities, including exercises in Cyprus and Slovakia, demonstrating great commitment to the unit. He genuinely loved being a member of the TA and was thoroughly excited at being mobilised. He saw it as his chance to do his job for real and to contribute to the restoration of Iraq. He will be sadly missed by all his friends and colleagues in the Regiment."
Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends at this very difficult time.
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Six Royal Military Police

Wednesday, June 25 2003 @ 10:03 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic -
The commanding officer of 156 Provost Company, Major Bryn Parry-Jones, said:
The loss of six soldiers from such a small, tight-knit unit as 156 Provost Company clearly comes as a dreadful shock to us all, not only the friends and families of those killed, but also all those in the Royal Military Police who knew and worked with them.
All these men were highly professional Soldiers and Policemen. Their deaths in action underlines the challenging and difficult operations that the RMP are asked to undertake both in peace and times of conflict.
From the oldest, aged 41, to the youngest, aged 20, these soldiers had between them a wealth of operational experience and distinguished service. You will understand that the circumstances surrounding this dreadful incident are still being investigated. At this time, our priority is giving all the support we can to the familes and friends who are having to cope with the loss of loved ones.
We ask our men and women to risk the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country, and it is the sad truth that sometimes that sacrifice comes to pass.
All six soldiers were extremely popular and well liked within the unit and they will be sadly missed by all of us.
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Leonard Harvy

Thursday, June 19 2003 @ 09:29 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Leonard Harvey, a civilian fire-fighter serving with the Defence Fire Service, died in hospital in the UK on 22 May 2003, having been taken ill while deployed in the Gulf on Operation Telic. Aged 55, Mr Harvey had served with the Defence Fire Service for 33 years, normally based at Wattisham in Suffolk.
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Ian Seymour

Friday, June 13 2003 @ 04:53 PM ESTContributed by: tomw
The Observer - Royal Navy Rating Ian Seymour, 28, yesterday had the unwelcome distinction of his body being the first of a British soldier to arrive back on home soil. Seymour, attached to 3 Commando Brigade, was killed when a helicopter crashed in the Kuwaiti desert, killing 11 other servicemen, British and American. A Manchester United fan who lived in Dorset, he was married to Lianne, 27 and was the father of their son Beck, three, named after his father's idol, David Beckham.
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Private Andrew Kelly

Monday, May 12 2003 @ 05:06 PM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic - It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Private Andrew Joseph Kelly died on 6 May in an accident whilst serving in Iraq. Aged 18, he was serving with 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment.
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Lance Corporal James McCue

Thursday, May 01 2003 @ 11:42 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Lance Corporal James McCue of 7 Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers. He died on 30 April 2003 following an explosion in southern Iraq. Aged 27, he came from Paisley, and was single.
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Piper Christopher Muzvuru

Wednesday, April 09 2003 @ 08:23 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Piper Christopher Muzvuru, 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, was killed in action in Basrah on 6 April.
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Lance Corporal Ian Keith Malone

Tuesday, April 08 2003 @ 08:20 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Lance Corporal Ian Keith Malone, 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, was killed in action in Basrah on 6 April.
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Lance Corporal Karl Shearer

Friday, April 04 2003 @ 08:24 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - The Commanding Officer of the Household Cavalry Regiment, Lieutenant Colonel Mark van der Lande OBE, issued the following statement:
"For the second time in less than a week, the Household Cavalry Regiment grieves a lost soldier. Lance Corporal Karl Shearer died on operations in Iraq on Monday 1st April and another soldier remains very seriously injured. My sympathy and that of the whole Regiment goes out to his widow, Suzie, to their daughter and their families at this difficult time and to the family of the injured man. Karl was a popular and very able soldier whom I had recently promoted. He demonstrated the very best of what it is to be a soldier of the Household Cavalry and will be greatly missed.
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Staff Sergeant Chris Muir

Thursday, April 03 2003 @ 08:23 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Staff Sergeant Chris Muir from the Army School of Ammunition, Royal Logistic Corps, based at Kineton. Aged 32, Staff Sergeant Muir was killed during an explosive ordnance disposal operation in southern Iraq on 31 March. He came from Romsey in Hampshire, and was married with a son.
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Lance Corporal Shaun Andrew Brierley

Wednesday, April 02 2003 @ 09:14 AM ESTContributed by: tomw

Operation Telic - "Lance Corporal Shaun Andrew Brierley, 28, was a member of 212 Signal Squadron which provides communications for HQ 1 (UK) Armoured Division. He was a Radio Systems Operator of nine years experience and was a highly regarded and well known member of the Squadron.
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Marine Christopher R Maddison RM

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 10:07 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Marine Christopher R Maddison RM, 539 Assault Squadron, who was killed in action during fighting in the area of Basrah on 30 March. His next of kin have been informed.
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Lance Corporal of Horse Matty Hull

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 10:03 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm that Lance Corporal of Horse Matty Hull of The Blues & Royals, Household Cavalry Regiment, was killed on 28 March in southern Iraq. He was 25, and based in Windsor.
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Corporal Stephen John Allbutt

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:59 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Corporal Stephen John Allbutt of the Queen's Royal Lancers. Aged 35, Corporal Allbutt came from Stoke-on-Trent and was married with two children.
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Trooper David Jeffrey Clarke

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:58 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Trooper David Jeffrey Clarke of the Queen's Royal Lancers. Aged 19, Trooper Clarke was single and came from Littleworth in Staffordshire. He joined D Squadron of The Queen's Royal Lancers in February 2002, and immediately deployed to Kosovo on peace support operations. having had a thoroughly rewarding tour, he volunteered to augment C Squadron for their deployment to the Gulf.
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Staff Sergeant Simon Cullingworth

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:55 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Staff Sergeant Simon Cullingworth of 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal). Aged 36, Staff Sergeant Cullingworth came from Essex and was married with two sons.
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Sapper Luke Allsopp

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:53 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Sapper Luke Allsopp, 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal). Aged 24, Sapper Allsopp came from North London.
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Lieutenant Andrew Wilson

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:48 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Lieutenant Andrew Wilson of the Royal Navy is missing, presumed killed, following the collision of two Mk 7 Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASAC) helicopters over international waters in the Gulf. The helicopters were from 849 Squadron A Flight, which is based at the Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, in Cornwall. The crash was not the result of enemy action and tragically there were no survivors.
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Lieutenant James Williams

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:46 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Lieutenant James Williams of the Royal Navy was killed when two Mk 7 Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASAC) helicopters collided over international waters in the Gulf. The helicopters were from 849 Squadron A Flight, which is based at the Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, in Cornwall. The crash was not the result of enemy action and tragically there were no survivors.
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Lieutenant Philip West

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:43 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Copied from Operation Telic - Lieutenant Philip West, Royal Navy, was killed when two Mk 7 Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASAC) helicopters collided over international waters in the Gulf. The helicopters were from 849 Squadron A Flight, which is based at the Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, in Cornwall. The crash was not the result of enemy action and tragically there were no survivors.
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Lieutenant Marc Lawrence

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:40 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm the death of Lieutenant Marc Lawrence, from 849 Squadron RNAS Culdrose.
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Lieutenant Antony King

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:38 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence can confirm that Lieutenant Antony King was killed when two Mk 7 Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASAC) helicopters collided over international waters in the Gulf. The helicopters were from 849 Squadron A Flight, which is based at the Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose, in Cornwall. The crash was not the result of enemy action and tragically there were no survivors.
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Sergeant Les Hehir

Monday, March 31 2003 @ 09:33 AM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with very deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Sergeant Les Hehir (pronounced 'HEAR'), of 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery. Aged 34, Les was married, with two sons, and lived in Poole, Dorset.
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Colour Sergeant John Cecil RM

Friday, March 28 2003 @ 04:23 PM ESTContributed by: tomw
Copied from Operation Telic - It is with deep regret that the Ministry of Defence has to confirm the death of Colour Sergeant John Cecil RM
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All these Deaths.................
and Guantanamo Bay.. THIS IS THE DEMOCRACY WE ARE GIVING IRAQ.....

Father Of British Guantanamo Prisoner Discusses Son's Imprisonment, Calls For Full Legal Rights

Azmat Begg whose son Moazzam is one of four remaining British detainees at Guantanamo Bay. Like other Guantanamo prisoners, for two years Moazzam has been denied contact with his family, access to a lawyer, and the right to a hearing to determine his legal status. [includes transcript] Five British detainees were released from Guantanamo Bay this week after being held for two years without charge. Upon their return to the UK, four of the five men were arrested and taken to a London police station. They are expected to face days of police questioning. Under the provisions of the Terrorism Act the men can be held for up to 14 days without charge. The fifth British detainee was released has accused the U.S. of injustice and the UK of complicity in his detention.

Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld defended the decision to release the five prisoners saying, "We got what we needed out of this crowd of five people, let's move them along!"

For over two years more than 650 people have been detained in a legal black hole at Guantanamo. They have been denied contact with their families, access to a lawyer, and the right to a hearing to determine their legal status.

Four British prisoners remain in Guantanamo Bay and are likely to be tried by a United States military court.

Families and lawyers of the four prisoners have insisted throughout their two-year-long detention that the men are innocent and were mistakenly caught up in the U.S. war on terror.

The Daily Telegraph reported that the Bush administration alleged the four remaining British men trained in terrorist camps and learned skills such as bomb-making. Lawyers for the men yesterday described the claims as "rubbish" and "tendentious" and expressed fears that they might have invented confessions under the psychological pressure of two years' detention without charge or trial and in the mistaken belief they might face the death penalty.

* Azmat Begg, his son Moazzam is one of four British who remain in custody at Guantanamo Bay.
* Rachel Meeropol, attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights. She is the grand daughter of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg who were executed on June 19, 1953.
Detention of prisoners

See also Camp X-Ray, Camp Delta
Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002
Enlarge
Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002

The use of Guantanamo Bay as a military prison has sparked protests from around the globe, particularly from human rights organizations concerned about reports of the torture and abuse of detainees. Critics of U.S. detainment policies also question the propriety of using an offshore prison, and the unclear legal status it causes for its detainees (neither prisoners of war, nor tried as common criminals). It is unclear whether the detainees are protected by the constitutionally guaranteed civil rights which would be invoked if they were detained in the United States.

On June 16, 2005, the U.S. Department of Defense announced a unit of defense contractor Halliburton will build a new $30 million detention facility and security perimeter around the base.

In the last quarter of the 20th century, prior to the decision by President George W. Bush to lead the United States into the War on Terror, the base was used to house Cuban and Haitian refugees intercepted on the high seas. Beginning in 2002, however, a small portion of the base was used to imprison suspected al-Qaeda and Taliban prisoners captured in Afghanistan and elsewhere at Camp X-Ray, Camp Delta and Camp Echo. As of June 2005, the United States was holding about 520 foreign terrorism suspects at the facility, some of whom were captured in Afghanistan. On September 22, 2004 ten prisoners were brought from Afghanistan.

Legal status

The particular legal status of Guantanamo Bay was a factor in the choice of Guantanamo as a detention center. Because sovereignty of Guantanamo Bay ultimately resides with Cuba, the U.S. government argued unsuccessfully that people detained at Guantanamo were legally outside of the U.S. and did not have the Constitutional rights that they would have if they were held on U.S. territory (see Cuban American Bar Ass'n, Inc. v. Christopher, 43 F.3d 1412 (11th Cir. 1995)). In 2004, the Supreme Court rejected this argument in the case Rasul v. Bush brought by the Center for Constitutitional Rights, with the majority decision and ruled that prisoners in Guantanamo have access to American courts, citing the fact that the U.S. has exclusive control over Guantanamo Bay.

On November 8, 2004 U.S. District Court Judge James Robertson ruled in Hamdi v. Rumsfeld that the Bush Administration could not try such prisoners as enemy combatants in a military tribunal and could not deny them access to the evidence used against them. [4] However, on 15 July 2005, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals in overturning Robertson ruled that al-Qaeda members could not be classified as prisoners of war and upheld military tribunals in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base for al-Qaeda members. This ruling does not necessarily authorize all military tribunals as the case only dealt with the POW status of al-Qaeda members.

Prisoners held at Camp Delta and Camp Echo have been labelled "illegal" or "unlawful enemy combatants", but a number of observers such as the Center for Constitutional Rights and Human Rights Watch maintain that the United States has not held the Article 5 tribunals specified by the Geneva Conventions. [5] The International Committee of the Red Cross has stated that, "Every person in enemy hands must have some status under international law: he is either a prisoner of war and, as such, covered by the Third Convention, a civilian covered by the Fourth Convention, [or] a member of the medical personnel of the armed forces who is covered by the First Convention. There is no intermediate status; nobody in enemy hands can fall outside the law." Thus, if the detainees are not classified as prisoners of war, this would still grant them the rights of the Fourth Geneva Convention (GCIV), as opposed to the more common Third Geneva Convention (GCIII) which deals exclusively with prisoners of war. Many have argued for the summary execution of all unlawful combatants, using Ex parte Quirin as the precedent, a case during World War II which upheld the use of military tribunals for six German soldiers caught on US soil. The Germans were deemed to be saboteurs and unlawful combatants, and thus not entitled to POW protections, and all were eventually executed for war crimes on request of the President of the United States of America.

A further concern is that most detainees were captured and transferred to the camp from non-U.S. soil. International laws regarding warfare would allow the United States to do so, but only if the persons can be classified as prisoners of war. Unless they are classified as prisoners of war, they fall under the protection of the GCIV and thus would qualify for protection against individual or mass forcible transfer under Article 49 of the GCIV. Because the detainees are not classified as prisoners of war, the legality of U.S. actions remains questionable.


Prisoner complaints

Three British prisoners, represented by the Center for Constitutional Rights released in 2004 without charge, have alleged ongoing torture, sexual degradation, forced drugging and religious persecution being committed by US forces at Guantanamo Bay. The prisoners have released a 115-page dossier detailing these accusations. [6] They have also accused British authorities of knowing about the torture and failing to respond.

The accounts of the British prisoners have been reiterated by two former French prisoners, a former Swedish prisoner, and a former Australian prisoner.

Former Guantanamo detainee, the Swede Mehdi Ghezali was freed on July 9, 2004 after two and half years internment. Ghezali has claimed that he was the victim of repeated torture. His lawyer has declared that he intends to sue the US for their treatment of him.

Former Guantanamo detainee Moazzam Begg, freed in January, 2005, after nearly three years in captivity, has accused his American captors of torturing him and other detainees arrested in Afghanistan and Pakistan.[7] Mr Begg, in his first broadcast interview since his release, claimed he "witnessed two people get beaten so badly that I believe it caused their deaths".

An Associated Press report asserted that some of the detainees were turned over to the United States by Afghan tribesmen in return for cash rewards. Detainees testified during military tribunals that bounties ranged from $3,000 to $25,000. The allegations were in transcripts the U.S. government released in compliance with a Freedom of Information lawsuit filed by AP. [8] There has not been independent confirmation of any of the above allegations since the U.S. government prohibits investigation by any third party.

The challenged to the Guantanamo detentions are coordinated by the Center for Constitutional Rights.


NGO reports

On November 30, 2004, The New York Times published excerpts from an internal memo leaked from the U.S. administration,[10] referring to a report from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

The ICRC reports of several activities which, it said, were "tantamount to torture": exposure to loud noise or music, prolonged extreme temperatures, or beatings. It also reported that a behavior science team (BSCT), also called 'Biscuit', and military physicians communicated confidential medical information to the interrogation teams (weaknesses, phobias, etc.), resulting in the prisoners losing confidence in their medical care.

Access of the ICRC to the base was conditional, as is normal for ICRC humanitarian operations, on the confidentiality of their report; sources have reported heated debates had taken place at the ICRC headquarters, as some of those involved wanted to make the report public, or confront the U.S. administration. The newspaper said the administration and the Pentagon had seen the ICRC report in July 2004 but rejected its findings.[11] [12]. The story was originally reported in several newspapers, including The Guardian, and the ICRC reacted to the article when the report was leaked in May.

In May 2005, a human rights report from Amnesty International reflects ongoing claims of prisoner abuse at Guantanamo and other military prisons. [14] [15][16]


Government and military inquiries

In response to the complaints of abuse by the prisoners and others, U.S. Navy Secretary Gordon England ordered a review of detainee incarceration practices at Guantanamo, conducted by a Navy inspector general, which concluded the facility was "being operated at very high standards."

On June 3, 2005, a U.S. military report supported allegations that US soldiers had abused the Qur'an. The report found that a soldier deliberately kicked a Qur'an; an interrogator stepped on a Qur'an; a guard's urine came through an air vent, splashing a detainee and his Qur'an; water balloons thrown by prison guards caused a number of Qur'ans to get wet; and a two-word obscenity was written in English on the inside cover of a Qur'an. It concluded that many other allegations of desecration were unfounded (see Qur'an desecration controversy of 2005).

In June 2005 the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee visited the camp and described it as a "resort" and complimented the quality of the food. However Democratic members of the committee complained that Republicans had blocked the testimony of attorneys representing the prisoners. [17]Democratic Senators have visited Guantanamo and they reported that they could not find evidence of abuse or mistreatment.

On June 10, 2005, as testimony was being given about alleged human rights abuses at Guantanamo, before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on reauthorization of the Patriot Act, Chairman James Sensenbrenner (one of the act's authors) declared debate over the detainees at Guantanamo Bay irrelevant.

On July 12, 2005 members of a military panel told the committee that they proposed disciplining prison commander Army Major General Geoffrey Miller over the interrogation of Mohamed al-Kahtani who was forced to wear a bra, dance with another man and threatened with dogs. The recommendation was overruled by General Bantz J. Craddock, commander of U.S. Southern Command, who refered the matter to the Army's inspector general.

The book, Inside the Wire by Erik Saar and Viveca Novak also claims to reveal the abuse of prisoners. Saar, a former US soldier, repeats allegations that female interrogators taunted prisoners sexually and in one instance wiped what seemed to be menstrual blood on the detainee. In reality it was just a red marker but the prisoner was unable to clean himself and hence unable to pray. Other instances of beatings by the IRF (initial reaction force) have been reported in this book and it supports the claim that the Qur'an was flushed down the toilet. An FBI email [20] from December 2003, six months after Saar had left, said that the Defense Department interrogators at Guantanamo had impersonated FBI agents while using "torture techniques" on a detainee.


'Exceptional treatment' of prisoners

The U.S. government has claimed it has accommodated religious needs. It has claimed that special religious diets are prepared [21], religious literature is supplied, and daily prayers are respected. But continued alleged religious harrassment is one of the triggers to the hunger strike that started on August 8, 2005. Detainee Omar Khadr told his lawyer that the camp authorities were only broadcasting the call to prayers four times a day, not the five times Islam requires. Further, camp authorities were allegedly offending the religious sensibilities of the detainees by having female personnel announce the call to prayers. Finally, he claimed that camp authorities were allowing guards to disrupt prayer sessions.

According to detailed accounts reported by the New York Times on June 24, 2005, from former interrogators, military doctors have assisted with refinement of the techniques interrogators have used on detainees, including advice on how to incrementally adjust psychological duress levels and manipulate fears, as a means of attempting to make the detainees more cooperative and willing to provide information.

A related article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported doctors involved with devising and supervising the interrogations indicated they understood the interrogation procedure refinements they gave advice on were designed to increase fear and distress, as a means to obtaining intelligence. Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman, while declining to address the specifics of the doctors' accounts, responded by asserting the doctors were not covered by ethics rules, since they were advising interrogators as behavioral scientists rather than treating patients.

According to a June 21, 2005 New York Times opinion article, [23] on July 29, 2004 an FBI agent was quoted as saying, "On a couple of occasions, I entered interview rooms to find a detainee chained hand and foot in a fetal position to the floor, with no chair, food or water. Most times they had urinated or defecated on themselves and had been left there for 18, 24 hours or more."

U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney suggested detainees were treated better than they would be "by virtually any other government on the face of the earth."

Air Force Lt. Gen. Randall Schmidt, who headed the probe into FBI accounts of abuse of Guantanamo prisoners by Defense Department personnel, concluded the man (a Saudi, described as the "20th hijacker") was subjected to "abusive and degrading treatment" due to "the cumulative effect of creative, persistent and lengthy interrogations." The techniques used were authorized by the Pentagon, he said. [24]
Guantanamo Bay Detainees by Nationality

Afghanistan | Algeria | Australia | Bahrain | Belgium | Canada | Denmark | Egypt | France | Iraq | Jordan | Kuwait | Libya | Maldives | Mauritania | Morocco | Pakistan | Qatar | Russia | Saudi Arabia | Spain | Sudan | Syria | Sweden | Tajikistan | Tunisia | Turkey | Uganda | United Kingdom | United States | Yemen | Unknown

Sort the Detainees by Last Name

To view the sources for the names on the list, click on the numbers after each name.
Afghanistan
Name Nationality Released
Abasin, Said 216, 90 Afghanistan R
Agha, Ismail 104 Afghanistan R
Ali, Sahibzada Usman 118, 146 Afghanistan R
Aslam, Noor 127 Afghanistan R
Badr, Badrzaman 181 Afghanistan R
Barak 181 Afghanistan R
Ehsannullah, 216 Afghanistan R
Farooq, Muhammad Naim 222 Afghanistan R
Fazil or Fadhil, Mullah 161 Afghanistan
Ghafar, Maulvi Abdul 176 Afghanistan R
Ghulab, Sher 176 Afghanistan R
Gul, Lall 181 Afghanistan R
Gul, Nate 109 Afghanistan R
Khairkhwa, Khairullah 161 Afghanistan
Khan, Alif 133 Afghanistan R
Khan, Aziz 172 Afghanistan R
Khan, Haji Mohammed 159 Afghanistan R
Khan, Juma 90 Afghanistan
Khan, Merza 216 Afghanistan R
Koochi, Naeem 218 Afghanistan
Mazloom, Fazel 215 Afghanistan
Mohammed 6 Afghanistan R
Mohammed, Hajii Faiz 208 Afghanistan R
Mohammed, Jan 208 Afghanistan R
Mohammed, Wazir 90 Afghanistan
Muhammad, Mirza 173 Afghanistan
Naqibullah 104 Afghanistan R
Osman, Haji 128 Afghanistan R
Osman, Mohammad 6 Afghanistan R
Rahman, Asadullah 100 Afghanistan R
Rahmatullah 100 Afghanistan R
Raouf, Mullah Abdel 161 Afghanistan
Razeq, Abdul 177 Afghanistan R
Rehman, Abdul 109 Afghanistan R
Rustam, 175 Afghanistan
Sabitullah 175 Afghanistan
Sarajudim 217 Afghanistan R
Shah, Rostum 107 Afghanistan R
Shah, Sliman 216 Afghanistan R
Shah, Sulaiman 216 Afghanistan R
Shah, Zakhim 216 Afghanistan R
Shakur, Mullah 216 Afghanistan
Shehzada, Mullah 192 Afghanistan R
Sidiq, Mohammed 208 Afghanistan R
Sidiq, Muhammad 172 Afghanistan R
Tahir, Mohammad 107 Afghanistan R
Ullah, Asad 145 Afghanistan
Wali, Badshah 195 Afghanistan R
Wazir, Mohammed 6 Afghanistan R
Zaeef, Mohammed 208 Afghanistan


Algeria
Name Nationality Released
Abdullah, Abu 188 Algeria
Ait Idir, Mustapha 206, 91 Algeria
Belkacem, Bensayah 2 Algeria
Boumediene, Lakhdar 206 Algeria
El Hadj, Boudella 206 Algeria
Lahmar, Saber 206 Algeria
Nechle, Mohamed 206 Algeria
Slaa, Byami Abu 206 Algeria
Zemiri, Ahcene 198 Algeria


Australia
Name Nationality Released
Habib, Mamdouh 203 Australia
Hicks, David 203 Australia


Bahrain
Name Nationality Released
Al Blooshi, Salah Abdul Rasool 141 Bahrain
Al Dossary, Juma Mohammed 141 Bahrain
Al Khalifa, Shaikh Salman bin Ebrahim 141, 98 Bahrain
Al Merbati, Isa 141, 121 Bahrain
Al Naoimi, Abdulla Majid 141 Bahrain
Al Wadi, Adil Kamil Abdullah 141 Bahrain
Hajii , Adil Kamel Abdullah 141 Bahrain


Belgium
Name Nationality Released
Zemmouri, Moussa 113 Belgium


Canada
Name Nationality Released
Khadr, Abdur Rahman 212 Canada R
Khadr, Omar 211 Canada

Denmark
Name Nationality Released
Abderrahmane, Slimane Hadj 214 Denmark R


Egyptian
Name Nationality Released
Elgazzar, Adel Fattouh Aly 184 Egyptian
El-Weledi, Reda Fadel 184 Egyptian
Mazrou, Alaa Abdel-Maqsoud 184 Egyptian
Meshad, Sherif 184 Egyptian
Rahman, Ahmed Abdel 174 Egyptian


France
Name Nationality Released
Benchellali, Mourad 163 France
Kanouni, Imad 162 France
Mustafa, Khaled ben 215 France
Patel, Mushtaq Ali 215 France
Ridouane, Khalid 215 France
Sassi, Nizar 162 France
Yadel, Brahim 163 France

France/India?
Name Nationality Released
Patel, Mustaq Ali 135 France/India?


Iraq
Name Nationality Released
Al Rawi, Bisher 95, 123 Iraq


Jordan
Name Nationality Released
Abdul Rahman, Wesam 215 Jordan
Al Asmar, Khalid 88 Jordan
Al Banna, Jamil 95, 102 Jordan
Asnar, Khalid 155 Jordan
Azzam, Hussein 155 Jordan
Nabaytah, Hassan 155 Jordan


Kuwait
Name Nationality Released
Al Ajmi, Abdullah Saleh Ali 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Azmi, Saad Madai Saad 204 Kuwait
Al Dihani, Mohammed Funaitel 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Kandari, Abdullah kamel bin Abdullah Kamal 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Kandari, Fayiz Mohammed Ahmed 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Mutairi, Khalid Abdullah Mishal 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Mutairi, Nasser Nijer Naser 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Odah, Fawzi Khalid Abdullah Fahad 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Rabiah, Fwad Mahmoud 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Shammari, Abdulaziz SayerOwain 204, 5 Kuwait
Al Zamil, Adil Zamil Abdull Mohssin 204, 5 Kuwait
Amin, Omar Rajab 204, 5 Kuwait

Libya
Name Nationality Released
Deghayes, Omar 210 Libya
Gherebi, Falen 210 Libya


Maldives
Name Nationality Released
Fauzee, Ibrahim 90 Maldives


Mauritania
Name Nationality Released
Ould Slahi, Mouhamedou 170 Mauritania


Morocco
Name Nationality Released
Abdullah, Ahmad 121 Morocco
Abdullah, Noorudeen 121 Morocco
Abdulsalam, Reswan 215, 196 Morocco
Al Ilmi, Muhammad 121 Morocco
Al Shaqoori, Usamah 121 Morocco
Al Shaqoori, Yunus 121 Morocco
Ali, Abu Sana 121 Morocco
Aouzar, Mohamed 157 Morocco
Ash Shaqoori, Usamah 210 Morocco
Bajadiyah, Saeed 121 Morocco
Benchakroun, Brahim 210 Morocco R
Binmoojan, Muhammad 121 Morocco
Chekkouri, Redouan 210 Morocco R
Chekkouri, Younes 210 Morocco
Feroze, Muhammad 121 Morocco
Ikassrien, Lahcen 187 Morocco
Mazouz, Mohamed 187 Morocco R
Shaqroon, Ibrahim bin 121 Morocco
Tabarak, Abdallah 207 Morocco

Pakistan
Name Nationality Released
Abbas, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Ahmad, Ali 148 Pakistan R
Ahmad, Ejaz 190 Pakistan
Ahmed, Sarfaraz 190 Pakistan
Alam, Noor 187 Pakistan R
Ali, Sarfraz 190 Pakistan
Ali, Syed Saim 190 Pakistan
Amin, Aminullah 190 Pakistan
Ansar, Muhammad 148, 146 Pakistan R
Anwar, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Ashraf, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Ayub, Haseeb 190 Pakistan
Dad, Fazal 190 Pakistan
Hanif, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Iilyas, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Iqbal, Faid or Faiq 148 Pakistan R
Iqbal, Zafar 190 Pakistan
Irfan, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Ishaq, Muhammad 147 Pakistan R
Jamaluddin, Muhammad 148 Pakistan R
Jan, Aziaullah 190 Pakistan
Khan, Alef 97 Pakistan R
Khan, Aziz 190 Pakistan
Khan, Badshah 190 Pakistan
Khan, Ejaz Ahmad 147 Pakistan R
Khan, Hamood ullah 190 Pakistan
Khan, Issa 193 Pakistan
Khan, Muhammad Ejaz 190 Pakistan
Khan, Muhammad Kashif 148 Pakistan R
Khan, Tariq Aziz 148 Pakistan R
Kifayatullah 190 Pakistan
Manzoor, Hafiz Liaqat 147 Pakistan R
Mar'i, Jamal Muhammad Alawi 147 Pakistan
Maula, Abdul 148 Pakistan R
Mehmood, Majid 147 Pakistan R
Mehmood, Talli 147 Pakistan R
Muhammad, Ali 190 Pakistan
Muhammad, Shah 175 Pakistan R
Naseer, Muneer bin 190 Pakistan
Nauman, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Omar, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Paracha, Saifullah 190 Pakistan
Rafiq, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Rahim, Abdul 151 Pakistan
Raza, Abid 190 Pakistan
Raza, Muhammad Arshad 190 Pakistan
Razaq, Abdul/Abdur 148 Pakistan R
Rehman, Abdul 190 Pakistan
Rehman, Hafiz Khalil ur 190 Pakistan
Rehman, Sajid-ur 148 Pakistan R
Saeed, Hafiz Ehsan 190 Pakistan
Saeed, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Safeesi, Abdul Sattar 190 Pakistan
Sagheer, Muhammad 208 Pakistan R
Salahuddin, Ghazi 148 Pakistan R
Sattar, Abdul 190 Pakistan
Shah, Syed Zia Hussain 190 Pakistan
Sultan, Zahid 190 Pakistan
Tariq, Muhammad 149 Pakistan
Tariq, Muhammad 190 Pakistan
Wali, Jehan/Jan 118 Pakistan R
Zaman, Badar uz 146 Pakistan
Zaman, Qaisir 148 Pakistan R


Qatar
Name Nationality Released
Al Marri, Jarallah Qatar


Russia
Name Nationality Released
Akhmyarov, Rustam 179 Russia R
Gumarov, Ravil 152 Russia R
Ishmuradov, Timur 179 Russia R
Khazhiyev, Shamil 169 Russia R
Kudayev, Rasul 169 Russia R
Mingazov, Ravil 179 Russia
Odigov, Ruslan 179 Russia R
Vakhitov, Aryat 153 Russia R

Saudi Arabia
Name Nationality Released
Aamer, Shaker Abdur-Raheem 122 Saudi Arabia
Al Anazi, Abdullah 112 Saudi Arabia
Al Areeni, Khalid 15 Saudi Arabia
Al Aseemi, Fahd Sultan Ubaid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Aushan, Abdul Aziz Sad 121, 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Aushan, Salih bin Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Aushan, Salman 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Badaah, Abdul Aziz bin Abdur Rahman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Bahooth, Ziyad bin Salih bin Muhammad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Barakati, Khalid 120 Saudi Arabia
Al Fawzan, Fahd Fawzan 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Fifi, Jaber 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Fouzan, Fahd 110 Saudi Arabia
Al Ghamdi, Abdur Rahman Uthman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Ghamdi, Khalaf Awad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Ghamdi, Saeed Farhah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Ghamdi, Zaid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Ghanimi, Abdullah Muhammad Salih 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Habardi, Mane Shaman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Harbi or Hahrbi, Mish 175 Saudi Arabia
Al Harbi, Ibrahim Daifullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Harbi, Tariq 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Jowfi, Rashid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Juaid, Rami Sad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Judaan, Hamood 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Juhani, Badr 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Juhdali, Ziyad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Jutaili, Fahd bin Salih bin Sulaiman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Kaabi, Jamil Ali 154, 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Khalafi or Khalaqi, Asim 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Khalidi, Sulaiman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Khowlani, Idrees 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Maaliki, Sad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Marrah, Khalid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Matrafi, Abdullah 4 Saudi Arabia
Al Mosleh, Abdullah Hamid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Muraqi, Khalid bin Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Musa, Abdul Wahab 224, 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Nasir, Ibrahim Muhammad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Nukhailan, Naif 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Nur, Anwar Hamdan 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Nusairi, Adil Uqla Hasan 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Omar, Wasm Awad Al Wasm 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Omari, Musa bin Ali bin Saeed 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Otaibi, Bandar 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Owshan, Abdul Aziz Sad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Owshan, Saleh bin Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Owshan, Salman or Sulieman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Qaaid, Rashid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Qahtani, Abdullah Hamid al Muslih 226 Saudi Arabia
Al Qahtani, Jaber Hasan 13, 24 Saudi Arabia
Al Qahtani, Mohamed 115 Saudi Arabia
Al Qahtani, Sad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Qurashi, Muhammad Abdur-Rahman Abid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Rabeesh, Yusuf 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Sabeei, Abdul Hadi Muhammad 224, 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Sabeei, Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Sabeei, Muhammad Jayid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Sayegh, Adnan Muhammad Ali 200 Saudi Arabia
Al Shaher, Salem 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shahrani, Muhammad bin Abdur Rahman 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shaibani, Bandar 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shammari, Majid Afas Radi Al Tumi 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shamri, Anwar Hamdan al Noor 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shareef, Fahd Umar 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shareef, Sultan 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shehri, Abdus Salam Ghaithan 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shehri, Saeed Ali Jabir ale Khuthaim 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shehri, Salim 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Shehri, Yusuf Muhammad 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Sulami, Yahya 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Umar, Ibrahim bin Umar 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Unzi, Abdullah Thani Faris Al Sulami 226 Saudi Arabia
Al Unzi, Khalid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Unzi, Rakan 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Unzi, Sultan Sari Saail 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Utaibi, Bajad bin Daifillah 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Utaibi, Bandar 224 Saudi Arabia
Al Utaibi, Muhammad Suroor 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Utaibi, Naif Fahd Al Aseemi 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Zahrani, Khalid 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Zahrani, Sad Ibrahim Ramzi al-Jundubi 121 Saudi Arabia
Al Zahrani, Yasser Talal 121 Saudi Arabia
As Sabeei or Al Sabeei, Muhammad Jayid 121 Saudi Arabia
As Sabeei, Abdul Hadi Muhammad 121 Saudi Arabia
As Sabeei, Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Aseeri, Turki Mashawi Zayid Ale Jabali 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shabani, Fahd Abdullah 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shahrani, Muhammad bin Abdur Rahman 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shaibani, Bandar 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shamari, Zain 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shamri, Anwar Hamdan al Noor 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shareef, Fahd Umar 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shareef, Sultan 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Sharikh, Abdul Hadi 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Sharikh, Abdur Razzaq 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shehri, Yusuf Muhammad 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shehri, Saeed Abdul Jabir ale Khutaim 121 Saudi Arabia
Ash Shehri, Saleem 121 Saudi Arabia
Ashadouki, Mishale 121 Saudi Arabia R
Bukhari, Abdul Hakeem 111 Saudi Arabia
Fouzan, Fahed 219 Saudi Arabia
Ghazi, Fahd Abdullah Ahmad 121 Saudi Arabia
Hamza, Abu 126 Saudi Arabia
Joaid, Abdul Rahman 224 Saudi Arabia
Muqaddam, Murtada 121 Saudi Arabia
Noor, Yusuf Khaleel 121 Saudi Arabia
Saud, Abu 10 Saudi Arabia


Spain
Name Nationality Released
Ahmed, Hamed Abderrahman 215, 189 Spain R

Sudan
Name Nationality Released
Ahmad, Rashid Hasan 117 Sudan R
Al Haj, Sami 96 Sudan
Al Qosi, Ibrahim Ahmed Mahmoud 129 Sudan
Babikir, Muhammad al Ghazali 116 Sudan R


Sweden
Name Nationality Released
Ghezali, Mehdi Muhammed 215 Sweden


Syria
Name Nationality Released
Al Muhammad, Mahmood Syria
Dukhan, Mamar Syria


Tajikistan
Name Nationality Released
Nabiyev, Yusuf 197 Tajikistan
Sharofov, Rukmiddin 197 Tajikistan
Vohidov, Muqim 197 Tajikistan

Tunisia
Name Nationality Released
Hkimi, Adel 93 Tunisia
Lagah, Lofti Ben Suihi 184 Tunisia
Mamrouk, Adel Ben Hamida 184 Tunisia
Nasri, Riadh Mohammad 94 Tunisia
Ridha, Yazidi 93 Tunisia
Sassi, Mohammed Ben Sala 157 Tunisia


Turkey
Name Nationality Released
Bayifkan, Lutfi 167 Turkey
Celik, Abdullah 167 Turkey
Celikgogus, Yuksel 142 Turkey R
Eksi, Mustafa 200 Turkey
Kurnaz, Murat 215 Turkey
Mert, Nuri 200 Turkey R
Sen, Ibrahim 200 Turkey
Sen, Mesut 200 Turkey
Uyar, Salih 200 Turkey
Uzel, Turgut 201 Turkey


Uganda
Name Nationality Released
Abdullah, Jamal 138, 121 Uganda


United Kingdom
Name Nationality Released
Abbasi, Feroz 221, 215 United Kingdom
Ahmed, Ruhal 215 United Kingdom R
Al-Harith, Jamal Udeen 215 United Kingdom R
Begg, Moazzam 221 United Kingdom
Belmar, Richard 194 United Kingdom
Dergoul, Tarek 194 United Kingdom R
Iqbal, Asif 203 United Kingdom R
Mubanga, Martin 144 United Kingdom
Rasul, Shafiq 204 United Kingdom R


United States
Name Nationality Released
Hamdi, Yasir Esam 229 United States

Unknown
Name Nationality Released
Arbaish, Khalid bin Suleiman 220 Unknown
Deghayes, Omar 187 Unknown
Maimoundi, Hassan 215 Unknown


Yemen
Name Nationality Released
Abd, Allah Ab Aljalil Abd Al Rahman 3 Yemen
Abdouh, Atag Ali 3 Yemen
Abdulraheem, Othman 3 Yemen
Ahmed, Fahmi Abdullah 3 Yemen
Ahmed, Faruq Ali 3 Yemen
Al Adahi, Mohamed 3 Yemen
Al Asadi, Mohamed Ahmed 3 Yemen
Al Askari, Mohsin Ali 3 Yemen
Al Assani, Fahmi Salem 3 Yemen
Al Azraq, Majid Hamoud 3 Yemen
Al Baasi, Mohsin Abdullah 3 Yemen
Al Bahlul, Ali Hamza Ahmed Sulayman 129 Yemen
Al Baidhani, Abdulkhaliq 3 Yemen
Al Busayss, Adil Said Al Haj Obeid 3 Yemen
Al Darbi, Ahmed 3, 228 Yemen
Al Dhabbi, Khalid Mohamed Saleh 3 Yemen
Al Dhabi, Salah Mohamed Saleh 3 Yemen
Al Dini, Omar Saeed 3 Yemen
Al Ghaith, Abdurahman ba 3 Yemen
Al Habashi, Raafat 3 Yemen
Al Haimi, Basheer Al Marwali 3, 228 Yemen
Al Haj, Sarqawi 3 Yemen
Al Hamd, Adel Saleh 3, 228 Yemen
Al Hassan, Sameer Naji 3 Yemen
Al Kazimi, Ali Nasser 3, 228 Yemen
Al Kouri, Farouq Ahmed 3, 228 Yemen
Al Madhoni, Musaab 3 Yemen
Al Mahdi, Ali Yahya Mahdi 3 Yemen
Al Marwalah, Bishir Naser Ali 3 Yemen
Al Matari, Fahd Al Haimi 3, 228 Yemen
Al Muhajiri, Abdulmajeed 3, 228 Yemen
Al Mujahid, Mahmoud Abdulaziz 3 Yemen
Al Qadasi, Khalid Massah 3 Yemen
Al Rabahi, Abdullah Ameen 3, 228 Yemen
Al Rahabi, Abdulmalik Abdulwahhab 3, 228 Yemen
Al Raimi, Ali Yahya Mahdi 3 Yemen
Al Raimi, Ismail Ali 3 Yemen
Al Razehi, Ali Ahmed Mohammad 3 Yemen
Al Salami, Ali Abdullah 3, 228 Yemen
Al Salami, Saleh Abdullah 3 Yemen
Al Samh, Adil Abu 3, 228 Yemen
Al Sarim, Saeed Ahmed 3 Yemen
Al Shamiri, Mustafa 3 Yemen
Al Siblie, Abdullah Yahya Yousuf 3, 228 Yemen
Al Suwaidi, Abdulaziz 3, 228 Yemen
Al Towlaqi, Fahmi 3, 228 Yemen
Al Wahab, Abd al Malik Abd 3 Yemen
Al Warifi, Mukhtaar 3 Yemen
Al Yafii, Al Khadir Abdullah 3, 228 Yemen
Al Zuhairi, Ahmed Zaid 3, 228 Yemen
Al-Tays, Ali Hussain 3, 228 Yemen
Amer, Jalal Salim bin 3, 228 Yemen
Anam, Suhail Abdo 3, 228 Yemen
Amro, Jalal Salem bin 3 Yemen
Anam, Suhail Abdo 3 Yemen
Aqeel, Sulaiman bin 3 Yemen
Batarfi, Ayman Saeed 3 Yemen
Ghanem, Mohamed Ragab Abu 3 Yemen
Hamada, Mohamed 3 Yemen
Hamdan, Salim Ahmed 130 Yemen
Hamdoon, Zahir Omar bin 3 Yemen
Hassan, Imad Abdullah 3 Yemen
Hassan, Mohammad Mohammad 3 Yemen
Hatem, Saeed 3 Yemen
Ismail, Yasin Qasem Muhammad 3 Yemen
Khasraf, Mohamed Nasser Yahya Abdullah 3 Yemen
Mujarrad, Talal Ahmed Mohamed 3 Yemen
Murshid, Ayoub 3 Yemen
Omar, Othman Ali 3 Yemen
Qaid, Yaseen 3 Yemen
Qassim, Khalid Ahmed 3 Yemen
Quraish, Nasr Abdullah 3 Yemen
Rabeii, Salman Yahya Hassan Mohammad 3 Yemen
Rashid, Hani Saleh 3 Yemen
Salman, Mohamed bin 3 Yemen
Shaalan, Hani Abdo Muslih 3 Yemen
Utain, Riyad 3 Yemen
Uthman, Abdur Rahim Mohammad Uthman 3 Yemen
Wazeer, Abdullah ba 3 Yemen


Abu Ghraib is only tip of the iceberg'

Crimes by US soldiers at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison which shocked the world are part of a larger pattern of abuses against Muslim detainees around the world, Human Rights Watch says.

The rights group released a summary of evidence of US abuse of detainees in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantánamo Bay (Cuba) as well as the Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) detention and torture methods.

"Abu Ghraib was only the tip of the iceberg," said Reed Brody, special counsel for Human Rights Watch.

"It's now clear that abuse of detainees has happened all over - from Afghanistan to Guantánamo Bay to a lot of third-country dungeons where the US has sent prisoners. And probably quite a few other places we don't even know about."

Human Rights Watch called this week for the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate the culpability of US Secretary of Defence Donald Rumsfeld and ex-CIA director George Tenet as well as Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, formerly the top US commander in Iraq, and Gen. Geoffrey Miller, the former commander of the prison camp at Guantánamo Bay for crimes against detainees.

It rejected last week's report by the US Army inspector general which was said to have absolved Gen. Sanchez of responsibility.

"Gen. Sanchez gave the troops at Abu Ghraib the green light to use dogs to terrorise detainees, and they did, and we know what happened," said Brody.

"And while mayhem went on under his nose for three months, Sanchez didn't step in to halt it."

Human Rights Watch also expressed concern that despite all the damage done by the detainee abuse scandal, the US had not stopped the use of illegal coercive interrogation.

In January 2005, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales claimed in a written response that the prohibition on cruel, inhuman or degrading (CID) treatment does not apply to US personnel while treating non-citizens abroad.

He indicated that no law would prohibit the CIA from engaging in CID treatment when it interrogates non-Americans outside the US.

Human Rights Watch said the US government was still withholding key information about the treatment of detainees, including directives reportedly signed by President George W. Bush authorising CIA to establish secret detention facilities and to "render" suspects to countries where torture is used.

"If the US is to wipe away the stain of Abu Ghraib, it needs to investigate those at the top who ordered or condoned abuse and come clean on what the president has authorised," said Brody.

"Washington must repudiate, once and for all, the mistreatment of detainees in the name of the war on terror."

The report details US abuse of detainees around the world:

Afghanistan: Nine detainees are now known to have died in US custody in Afghanistan, including four cases already determined by army investigators to be murder or manslaughter. Former detainees have made scores of other claims of torture and mistreatment.

In a March 2004 report, Human Rights Watch documented cases of US personnel arbitrarily detaining Afghan civilians, using excessive force during arrests of non-combatants and mistreating detainees.

Detainees held at military bases in 2002 and 2003 described being beaten severely by guards and interrogators, deprived of sleep for extended periods, and intentionally exposed to extreme cold as well as other inhumane and degrading treatment.

Guantánamo Bay: There is growing evidence that detainees at Guantánamo have suffered torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.

Reports by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents who witnessed detainee abuse - including chained detainees forced to sit in their own excrement - have recently emerged, adding to the statements of former detainees describing the use of painful stress positions, military dogs to threaten, threats of torture and death, and prolonged exposure to extremes of heat, cold and noise.

Iraq: Harsh and coercive interrogation techniques such as subjecting detainees to painful stress positions and extended sleep deprivation have been routinely used in detention centres throughout Iraq.

A panel appointed by Secretary Rumsfeld noted 55 substantiated cases of detainee abuse in Iraq plus 20 instances of detainee deaths still under investigation.

An earlier report found "numerous incidents of sadistic, blatant, and wanton criminal abuses" constituting "systematic and illegal abuse of detainees" at Abu Ghraib.

CIA disappearances and torture:

At least 11 Al Qaeda suspects, and most likely many more, have "disappeared" while in US custody.

The CIA is holding the detainees at undisclosed locations with no notification to their families, no access to the Red Cross and oversight of any sort of their treatment. In some cases, no acknowledgement even, that they are being held, effectively placing them beyond the protection of the law.

Extraordinary renditions:

The CIA has transferred some 100 to 150 detainees to countries in the Middle East known to practice torture routinely.

Reverse renditions:

Detainees arrested by foreign authorities in non-combat and non-battle field situations have been transferred to the US without basic protection afforded to criminal suspects.
check out the The War in Iraq swicki at eurekster.com